Manage the Moment: Conversations in Performance Psychology

Mitchie Brusco - X Games Gold Medalist, Professional Skateboarder, History Maker

October 22, 2019 Mitchie Brusco Episode 3
Manage the Moment: Conversations in Performance Psychology
Mitchie Brusco - X Games Gold Medalist, Professional Skateboarder, History Maker
Chapters
Manage the Moment: Conversations in Performance Psychology
Mitchie Brusco - X Games Gold Medalist, Professional Skateboarder, History Maker
Oct 22, 2019 Episode 3
Mitchie Brusco

Mitchie Brusco is an action sports athlete, professional skateboarder, skydiver, and a record-setter who has done things that no one else on the planet has done. Mitchie pushes the progression of skateboarding farther than anyone else has before. He has also learned to build trust in himself as an athlete while facing real-life risks on a daily basis. Learn how Mitchie manages fear & risk, the pressures of competition, pushing the envelope in sports, and the expectations of others when you are seen as the best in your field. Dr. Shepp sits down with Mitchie to talk about sports psychology and the pursuit of continued excellence in what may be his most in-depth interview.

Follow on Twitter @drshepp   

Follow on Instagram @drshepp

Follow Mitchie on Twitter @MitchieBrusco84

Follow Mitchie on Instagram MitchieBrusco84

Learn more about Dr. Shepp  at SportandPerform.com

Podcast transcripts coming soon at: ManageTheMoment.net

YouTube Channel coming soon!

Music by Brad Buxer

Show Notes Transcript

Mitchie Brusco is an action sports athlete, professional skateboarder, skydiver, and a record-setter who has done things that no one else on the planet has done. Mitchie pushes the progression of skateboarding farther than anyone else has before. He has also learned to build trust in himself as an athlete while facing real-life risks on a daily basis. Learn how Mitchie manages fear & risk, the pressures of competition, pushing the envelope in sports, and the expectations of others when you are seen as the best in your field. Dr. Shepp sits down with Mitchie to talk about sports psychology and the pursuit of continued excellence in what may be his most in-depth interview.

Follow on Twitter @drshepp   

Follow on Instagram @drshepp

Follow Mitchie on Twitter @MitchieBrusco84

Follow Mitchie on Instagram MitchieBrusco84

Learn more about Dr. Shepp  at SportandPerform.com

Podcast transcripts coming soon at: ManageTheMoment.net

YouTube Channel coming soon!

Music by Brad Buxer

Dr. Shepp:

Thanks for tuning in to manage the moment, conversations in performance psychology. I'm Dr. Sari Shepphird.

Mitchie Brusco:

A lot of people ask , how are you not scared, are you kidding me? I'm scared all the time, like I'm literally terrified. Oh , majority of the time. I explained that. It's like I think the people like me and the people like these guys I've mentioned, kind of just found a way to have a healthy relationship with year and learn how to kind of live with it and use it as kind of like a chisel to make yourself a little bit more precise, a little bit more well thought out, and it's kind of what keeps me in that focus .

Dr. Shepp:

Michi Brusco is someone who is well acquainted with fear. In fact, he's one of those athletes who faces realistic fears and risks nearly every day of his life, both as a professional skateboarder and in his more recent pursuit of skydiving. Having logged over 940 jumps at the time of this recording. Mitchie is also someone who has done things that no one else on the planet has done, like landing a 1260 in a skateboard, big air competition as Michie pushes the progression of skateboarding farther than anyone else has done before. He has learned to build trust in himself as a performer, as an athlete and as a human being. I recently sat down with Michie outside on a summer evening in orange County, California for what may be the most in depth interview he has given. And in these moments, Michie describes his process, his preparation, and how he gets his mind into the moment when everything needs to come together in a competition. Hey Mitchie , how are you?

Mitchie Brusco:

I'm doing well. Thank you. Thank you for, thank you for having me and reaching out. I'm pretty excited to sit down and chat for a bit.

Dr. Shepp:

Oh, great. Thanks. Yeah, I'm really excited about it too. You're not only , um , an action sports athlete who's won X games gold, but you're also an innovator. It sounds to me, from what I know about you, that you want to be able to constantly push things forward.

Mitchie Brusco:

Yeah, I guess so. I mean you say like action sports athlete and I mean you say innovator, but it's like, to me it's like been the same process like one without the other. It never would have been a thing. I think the things that got me into those contests , the things that made that path possible was kind of trying to do different things. You know? I wasn't like I was following footsteps and taking advice and I was like really paying attention, but when it come time I'd try something else. I try to, okay well everyone can do this, I can do this now. Obviously it's go time. And as a little kid that made a lot of sense. It's go time, tried to learn something, one step, you know more. And then so that kind of opened the door and then I've just tried to stay with that idea that like, well got me here is kind of what I should keep doing. And like, yeah, just don't be predictable and keep, keep pushing.

Dr. Shepp:

So you're , you're a creative athlete. I mean you're not just doing what you're told to do. You're also wanting to think about how you can expand things.

Mitchie Brusco:

Yeah. I mean I don't like, I don't, I am getting better as I get a bit older. I'm getting better at really grinding some specific tricks and things that I really need to have consistently. But doing the same thing over and over for me is not, not what I look forward to. So like always trying to expand and try new things. Yeah. It's just basically it's keeping myself entertained in kind of, it's now within the realm of competing and a at like a high level in skateboarding. But how do I keep doing that and stay just blissfully entertained. The like a majority of the time it's kind of like you're forced to try to learn new things cause it's just going to get monotonous and no time. So which motivates

Dr. Shepp:

So what motivates you more, the, the entertaining yourself and pushing yourself or the [inaudible] competition .

Mitchie Brusco:

They work, they work together. Uh, if I wasn't getting ready to compete, I would not push myself as hard and I would not open those doors to then be ready to try these new things that I want to. So it's kind of like within the process of working, let's say I do work on a run for four months, five months, by about halfway through I'm like man I need to add something and I'm like I can't do the same. I'm doing three tricks that are exactly, they're different. But in my head they start to feel the same cause they kind of work from the same origin I guess. And it's like that's not okay. We got to add something new in one of those tricks . So all of a sudden now I'm learning different ways to get through this like run that I built that I worked super hard on. So that's where the consistency and that's where the contest comes in and then then I start picking at my brain. Once I get it down, once I do it well enough it's like it doesn't, it just doesn't stop there. Like it's like I, I can't physically work on something the same like beyond reason. Like, some people are like super good at that, but once it gets to a certain point and I got it down like, okay , grind it for a couple of weeks and then I just naturally I start changing things and adding things. And I think that's important in a subjective sport to do things that excite you because if you're getting judged, that excitement is like , uh , what's the word? That excitement it. People feed off of it and it kind of like you can feel it and a judge can feel it and the crowd can, it's like if you're doing something you do all the time, it's like sometimes it doesn't have the same effect. So I think everything kind of has a nice like relationship with each other to kind of keep the process, you know, kind of sound.

Dr. Shepp:

There is this sense of the crowd being a big part of what happens. And even if you've seen the same sick trick done , um, a couple years in a row, three years in a row, it , it might be like intense to watch and, and, and sick trick to do. But you still kind of get the sense that it's been done before so the crowd gets a little bit more mellow. It's just, it's a little bit more predictable even if it's a really, really difficult run. I mean

Mitchie Brusco:

it's like it's, it's like anything, if you go to a comedy show and then you go again, I mean if you've heard the punchline before, it's not going to be a new memory. It's not going to be something that sticks with you. And I think that's something that like action sports specifically and skateboarding it I think has been so beautiful because growing up I have so many memories because I watched these people, I look up to create memories like for themselves and I kind of feel like I shared that and it like pushed me to now be in the spot that I'm in. And so going in and repeating something is like, it's a good strategy and it works and it's fun and you can do it for a long time and you can, you know, and you need to pay the bills and you need to stay healthy and it is awesome. You watching it, it is awesome. But it never will match the moment of something new happening. Like, you know what I mean? It's , it's never gonna match that.

Dr. Shepp:

And it's interesting just how your culture is so different than my generation. Right? Because you were born in 97 so, and Tony Hawk's 900 was in 99 so, so as long as you can remember, you've seen this kind of outcome in your sport. Nine hundreds where have happened

Mitchie Brusco:

before I ever stepped on escape. Yeah . So first time I stepped on a skateboard, I knew technically, you know, nine hundreds could be done,

Dr. Shepp:

which is so crazy for someone like me who all of a sudden, what's, what's ex games? Like when I grew up, there was no such thing. Right? So it's, it's really different for my generation to see the progression as being something outside of our scope outside of the world. And then here's this phenomenon that now is now, it's a part of our culture, but it's a good , there was a beginning for us. Right? But for you it's always existed.

Mitchie Brusco:

Like the, like the origin, you're like you were there for the origin and you're there for the beginning and the start and then like the trials and figuring out what the sport is and if it belongs on a big stage or not. Or big big ramps came into play somewhere along the way, you know, 99 2005 like big air started and you know, all these new things. And these are times when I'm , I'm just coming up on a skateboard. I'm like watching, you know, I'm four years old, five years old and I'm watching Danny way do megaramp and I'm watching Tony Hawk do nine hundreds and I'm watching these people push the boundaries. So I mean ever since I was a kid, I was like, yeah, people do five forties they flip their board, they do nine hundreds they compete. This is a thing, you know, it just always was. I was just, I guess that the perfect at the perfect time in ed , somehow with no one in my family ever skateboarding ever being involved. Somehow I got my eyes on the right content for me.

Dr. Shepp:

It probably gave you a different sense of what's possible?

Mitchie Brusco:

Oh, I mean it definitely shaped like I watched very few skate videos growing up and they were so different like the DC video with Danny way doing mega ramp and I'd watch almost around three with day one song doing flat ground tricks and kick flips and manuals and you know, and, and those two extremes kind of fascinated me a lot more than, than like going down eight stairs and doing a trick or hitting a rail, like for some reason like the two, those two outliers where is always what I was watching when I was five, six years old and it's now how I skate. I'm either doing, you know, I might have 50 feet in the air or skating vert or preparing for a contest or when I mess out around at the skate park I'm on, I'm on the manual pattern. I'm playing skate on flat ground. I'm like, I S I , I know I struggle in the, in between zones. It's really weird. Like where everyone seems to exist in skateboarding. I kind of, I'm on the [inaudible] , I can't, for some reason, I'm kinda on the, on the weird cusps of what I like to do.

Dr. Shepp:

Well, as I came to know a little bit more about your background, it , that's not just true with skateboarding, right, because you also, so tell me a little bit about the, the um, the jumping you do.

Mitchie Brusco:

Oh, Oh , with, with skydiving, man. So growing up within action sports, I mean, I say within action sports because I was obsessed with it. I wasn't like growing up in like at X games every year when I was super young, but I was for some reason just like vert skating was, I could do that. I knew I could do it. It was the , I can't explain it. Um, and then I'd see guys, Travis Pastrana and Bob Burnquist and Matt Hoffman and these names who are so like huge and X games who sometimes go skydiving or base jumping or flying parachutes or landing on the ramp and then skating the contest or you know, doing these, doing these things that, so I think through that process, once I started competing, once I started skating and you know, started to feel like, Hey, I kind of have some of this, like some of that juice I have like kind of, you know, all the kids I was skating with aren't at these contests now. And like everyone I grew up with as kind of seeming to go a different route and I'm kind of getting more and more in this zone of competing and like doing a good job that I think I had so much faith in myself and I built that trust and I started to feel like with those guys, you know, and then I turned 18 and I did a tandem skydive. Just a normal one. Just like, I think a lot of people have that story. I think a lot of people turn 18 into a skydive . I didn't expect anything from it. I went with a couple of friends. It was cool and that was it. And as soon as that parachute opened and I was sitting there with, with this kid called Mikey, who took me on my tandem and we landed and I started asking questions like, how do I , how do I start? What's going on? And I was back in three days, learning, learning how to , no question, is it hard? Is it this is it that? It was like, where do I start? Hmm . Have you ever asked those questions though? When you're thinking about progression and developing new tricks, do you ever ask if it's hard? Um, everything is hard. There is not, there's not one thing that I've done that I'm proud of or that usually on a daily basis that's genuinely easy. So I think you just get used to pushing through that everyday . A lot of people ask me, it's , it's actually, it makes me very curious. A lot of people ask me, how are you not scared? And I'm like, are you kidding me? I'm scared all the time. Like I'm literally terrified a majority of the time. And like I explained that it's like, I think the people like me in the people, like these guys I've mentioned kind of just found a way to have a healthy relationship with that fear and learn how to kind of live with it and use it as kind of like a chisel to make yourself a little bit more precise, a little bit more well thought out. And when it's time, when it's go time it, it's kind of what keeps me in that focus and that zone. It's like, so I do ask all the time, is it so, so much of this stuff is so dumb. It's like, but that need that. Like the , the, I didn't choose to want these things. Like it almost sucks sometimes to be in these positions. Like to I'm going to try a 1260 today. Like I was so excited two months ago and now it's time. And I'm like , uh , but you learn how to push through those and you learn how to feel if it's right or if it's wrong or in , I mean that comes with mistakes, but hopefully they're not too bad and you say, I'm not feeling it today. I don't have to do this. It's not the day I'm staying on the ground. I'm not going to skydive . I'm not going to skate guy . I'm not going to go to this for not going to do a 900 in this contest. Like those days happen and they kind of slip under the radar. And so I think having like a , a healthy relationship with fear is probably, I think the D a difference maker for sure.

Speaker 4:

[inaudible]

Dr. Shepp:

it makes a lot of sense. And it also makes sense that you find a way to focus on what you're about to do as a way to tune out the fear. So you become hyper focused on executing your tricks.

Mitchie Brusco:

Yeah, for sure. I mean, usually I'll focus on a couple of really simple things that I know if I do those things right, even if I don't land it, even if something happens, if I hit spot one with this speed and I take off and it feels like this and I keep my, my key thought, you know, throughout the whole thing, I'll be fine. And just whenever something else comes in, if, if I'm not comfortable with that process kind of shifted a little bit. Okay. Think of it like this. Take off, think about spinning as hard as you can not take off. Oh, that's really scary. That means no touch, no anything kind of re reframe it. Okay. Relax and take off smooth. It's like, okay , I like that. Just take off smooth and hold it. Okay. Smooth and hold it and then kind of all of a sudden it feels good and then it's time and you go and then before you know it, you're standing there, it's over, you're okay. And you're like, okay, I trusted a little bit more now. I trust it just a little bit more now. And it's kind of like you play that game and then you know, when it's time you stand up on it. It's kinda like always kind of in the, for me I guess.

Dr. Shepp:

No, but that makes sense because you're focused on the process of executing your skill and when you talk yourself through it, you use some cue words. Yeah , for sure . Yeah. Some keywords , like you said, so that even though the trick might not last long in terms of seconds, you're able to break it down a few key

Mitchie Brusco:

things that you focus on to work your way through it. Yeah. And it just, that I think that feeling of safety and comfort and you know, I think if you can find that within the, within the moments of like all this fear, because it doesn't go away, the fear does not go away. But if you can find those little moments, like if I do this, you know, if I take off this way I'll be fine. And then you know, you can take off that way. You're like, every time you get scared you're like, I can do this though. You know, you're kind of this battle, do it, do it right, but you also can do it. And then just not letting that eat you alive kind of and staying kind of on it. And then the thing I've gotten better at with more experience is when I'm in the air, when I'm skateboarding to know if it's good or bad. Right? Because when you're first learning a bunch of these tricks, you have no idea. It feels like I'm leaning back a little bit. It's like, it's like good or bad. Like you're going to come in and the only way to know is try to land a couple, you know, you fall forward. Sometimes you lean too far forward, you felt it in the air, but you didn't know what it meant. And then, so now when it came to a 1260 I was spinning, I got through 900 and I was like, no alarms were going off in my head. I was almost like in my, like I was literally thinking like, like really like is this the one? Like there's literally, there's nothing wrong with it. Like, you know, I was coming around, I got through 900 I had that last spin that like, well that was the one that was giving me the most trouble in my head. And I got there and it just looked good. It felt good. I was like, man, we're here and there's nothing wrong with it, you know, and like the , I think that's just from experience of being in similar places and I've made stuff way worse than that. Way more put myself in such a bad spot on a five 40 take off, leaning too far forward, pop out when too high. It's windy, didn't take account anything inland it and you're like, Whoa, I got lucky on that one. And but like it's almost like if it's a scarier trick that you don't know, it has to be even better. And it kind of like, I dunno , there was nothing wrong with it. There was no, so you knew on that last rotation that you were going to land it pretty much since I took off. I mean since you took, I mean, yeah, pretty much. I was like, it felt good. And then as I came, as I got to 900 it was like, and then I could see it, I could see the landing. I knew I was like in the perfect spot. I knew the spin was just not over rotated and it was almost like just surreal. Like that moment lasted forever. That last, that last rotation usually when I would try 1260 the last rotation would last forever cause my back, it feels like my back is to the ramp forever. But the one I made, I felt like I looked at where I was going to land and I just, that is what sticks out in my head that like that visual of seeing that this is going to work right now. Like this just worked, you know? And it kind of feel like everything froze in that, in that moment for sure. [inaudible] was, was just hyper that day. Oh for sure. For sure. I mean , uh, yeah, there's no, there's no question. I mean, I watched the video and I'm blown away. Yeah . I think about it now and I wouldn't want to go try anything close to that. You know, it's like getting back to normal and people have probably asked you if it felt like slow motion. Um, actually nobody, nobody has asked that. Um, it felt really consistent. That's, I think that's what sticks out to me. Cause a lot of the attempts on the 1260, I tried four before that, right? Two in Shanghai months before and then to in that same contest right before I made it in the spin, felt like I'd speed up and slow down and speed up and slow down within, within the spin. And the one that I made felt that had a really nice pace all the way through. So I don't know if that means slow motion. I just think that means I wasn't in a rush. Okay , great . I think that means I wasn't trying to skip anything. I was just kind of hanging out, kind of knew that I would get around in the, when I turned my back to the ramp that last time I wasn't freaking out and then I saw it and it was good. So maybe slow, but I think I was just patient enough. That's a great description. Yeah. And so most people listening are gonna know what you're talking about, but for those who don't, so the 1260 of course is three and a half rotations. Yeah. Yeah. It was uh, uh, the, the bigger contests in Minneapolis just couple of weeks ago. It was in , uh , end of July was it? Man is four weeks ago. It feels like an eternity cause this month in August, August 3rd. That's wild. Um, so yeah, skateboard, a big air , 1260 on the quarter pipe, three-and-a-half rotations. And uh, it got silver cause though the way the, so I won the year before in, in big air and then this year I got silver because it's scored half on the quarter pipe and half over the gap. And I did a really easy gap Trek to set up for it. So I maxed out the score on the quarter and kind of had a dot on the, on the gap, which was worth it for me. I mean, you know, my style and you know of like, well let's do something else. Obviously I assumed you want the gold. Forgive me for forgetting . No, it's, it's fine. It's like a lot of people have that question and I really don't like, how did you not win? It's like I care pretty much zero because I could technically, I could have one and not have had this opportunity or so many opportunities from it and so many cool conversations that I w I think I will always choose if the, if it's there, I will always choose the route of something new for me. Something new in the contest, something fresh, something fun. Then trying to do an equation to win something. So you want to go before, I know. So when you compare the two, this, this is more meaningful to you. They're exactly the same. Cause I did it , I did a 10 80 for and I got gold. And to me, you know, being the only person to do a 10 80 [inaudible] in a megaramp con contest is cool. But for me it's like I didn't know if I could do that. It's so that was like something that was fry . Yeah. Throw a gold medal on. I'm not complaining, you know? Um , but I think that are equally as special and without one, without that 10 80 a 1260 never would've crossed my mind. And just the same way that, you know, at 1260 happens, you start scratching your head like, well , kind of blew the lid off of that one. Yeah. Like, you know, there's a kid out there who is three years old who just watched a 1260 happen, which that's, that was me, other than nine hundreds. Right, right. And you know, 900 happens, everyone goes, that's it. [inaudible] that's, we got there, we did the most. Okay. And we'll now someone did a tangy . It's like, Nope, all right , now we're done, now we're tending . And then now at 1260 happens in the same thing. It's like we can't go anymore. We did 1260s it , but there some kid out there who now knows that if he wants to do 1260s he can. And so it's like that you can't compare it, you know, a gold to a silver or this year, that year it's like they're different, they're different memories. There are different things. And it's just kinda like that one opened the door to the next. I mean I love the contest. I was a complete dud in as well because it showed me what mistakes I made. You know, it's like there is not any good without the bad, that's for sure. And you keep learning. Oh, never stopped. Never stopped even getting silver or gold or whatever. It's like you learn every time and I mean if you're not learning you , I mean I get bored. Yeah. You know what I mean? Like imagine knowing everything, like what ? What'd you do? Right ? Like you are not going to get paid enough as a coach to know everything. It's not going to help you anywhere in life. So if I don't learn anything on my skateboard, I learned off. I think that's where I've learned the most growing up a little bit, like growing up as in like once I became turned 18 I moved out and all this stuff and I kept competing. Like I am way more focused and my schedule is way tighter and I'm way stronger and healthier and dialed in than I was when I was 1617 when I lived at home. Because it's like it's now if I, if I'm going to do this, it's my, it's my decision. So preparing for contests is where I've learned the most. I used to work out, I eat right, I go to the ramp these days during the week, work on these runs, work on this. And that I think is where I've learned so much every contest it motivates me more and more. Cause no matter how hard I work, I get there and I'm like, I could've worked harder, you know? And it's kinda been a slow, you used to prepare one month, one month, super hard, get a rundown . Ooh , I could've done a little more two months this year I did five months, four months, five months straight, getting ready for X games, same ramp, same people, same runs. And I get there and I'm like, I'm not ready for this. Like, so now I'm just trying to be more even keeled and consistent coming off of X games a month ago less . And um , on my schedule, you know, I'm in the gym, I'm at the Ram skydiving, I'm a little bit more relaxed in skating, super way more relaxed, you know, I'm still good coming down, but my goal is to be more consistent for closer to eight to 10 months, even if it's for one contest, then you know, the last three kind of peak, you know, so sometimes you learn a foot placement, sometimes you learn a trick. But lately I've just been learning that like managing your time and managing your, your mental mentality and your mental health and not letting all these like influences around you eat at your, at your energy or your time or your motivation. Just kinda keep it easy and just stay consistent and then, then then hit it hard and you on foundational just be better and, and better.

Dr. Shepp:

You take responsibility for yourself as an athlete for sure . Yeah, I mean, I can , I can hear that. But you also have, like you described, I'm sure a lot of people who have expectations for you. So you've been skating since you were skateboarding since you were , um , three since you were a little guy, but you already had expectations on you by the time you were five.

Mitchie Brusco:

Yeah, for sure. Um, and I'm used to it. I've always been a skateboarder. I've always been a competitor and the day I don't want to compete, I won't. And I've always preached that. And it is so true. Like I love that people believe in me enough to where they think it's easy for me. You know, that that happens. Some, some friends or acquaintances maybe, I don't know so well or you know, sometimes even in my family sometimes it's like, you know, they're just, you know, show up to a contest and be like, yeah, you mean this is what you, this is what he does, you know? And I can tell and that's fine. Where for me it's like, that's awesome that you guys have this like faith in me, the blind faith that, you know, it's a blessing to be that consistent. But to me it's very much a real thing. And for me, and I think that was evident, like you know, I made the 1260 if you watch the video, I almost had no reaction. I remember that. And well even the cast or even Graham was like, wait, what? What just happened? Or you were confused? Everyone who was confused. I was confused then and I think I was so in my, in my zone and it was so for me that I did it and I was just kinda like, it was a mixture between a Pat on the back to myself and also like I worked so hard and I put so much energy and effort into this one thing and it's over. It's like, it was almost like a more of a hard goodbye than a, than a real party. It's like, dude, it's like in a superhero movie. If he just kills the, the villain, what do you do? What are you going to be a superhero for? And it kind of felt like I had just , I put it to bed and I was like, wow. Like, this kept me up for months, like breakdowns and so sessions alone and eating at my whole life and like getting like making relationships harder, making my like family life home life, like skating, like it was stressing everything out and then I did it. It was like good and it was, it wasn't easy but it worked and then it was just like damn, like it's over. And it was so like for me that I was like, if I were to throw in a board and the area would have been so fake, Hmm . You know, I, I walked down the ramp, I was happy to, I gave my roommate a hug and that's about all that, all that happened and ever since I've just had a little smile on my face and that's like, I'm totally cool with that. That more of a like even keeled kind of come [inaudible]

Dr. Shepp:

that probably helps you though, right? Because if it's, if it's more of a rollercoaster , um, and if, if you have a hard time letting go of something, you're not going to be looking forward.

Mitchie Brusco:

And I know some people who thrive like that who are just an absolute mess, a roller coaster. And when they're on their so on and when they're off they're off. Where I have a lot of average days, I have a lot of really good average days and I like that.

Speaker 5:

And [inaudible]

Mitchie Brusco:

I built such a strong shell around myself, like an emotional shell. I was so strong. I mean I still am, but for that moment I was so strong, so relaxed, so smooth that like if I made it, if I didn't, if I got hurt, if I won, I don't think I would have fluctuated much. It was like just the real slow release after it was really nice cause it went a good way and not a bad way. Sure . But I was so solid and where I was my, my state I guess that, you know, doing a 1260 didn't really knock me out of that. It was like, it was like I look at it like holding your follow through on, I cook on like a golf swing. Like if I was, if I was this close to freaking out and losing it, it would have never, it would have never happened.

Dr. Shepp:

I was going to ask if that's what helps you trust yourself more, the fact that you're kind of solid.

Mitchie Brusco:

I've used the same thing for so long. I understand. Like I almost lost it. Right? Right before the contest. I almost lost it but I didn't. But I knew I almost lost it and I started talking to myself and I started, I was like, I was, it was too intense and I was more numb than I was comfortable and it's easy to not know, not notice that where you know when you are comfortable , when you are in the zone you are numb to a lot of things. You know, fricking Obama could walk by and my eyes are on the ramp. Like you know what I mean? Like there you are numb to a lot of these things that normally you would catch your attention. Yeah. But it was like numb in a way where I wasn't genuinely five minutes before the contest, I was not ready. And then I just told myself like, dude, like I was completely alone. I had my own zone, I was just like, whatever you are feeling like please like feel it now. Like it's like time to like something's going to happen soon. Like you know, and that moment always just like flushed with all this like overwhelming emotion. And it was just like this huge spike and then, you know, and that made me more comfortable. I was like, I felt human again. Like it was me feeling though it wasn't these outside pressures that I was like kind of , I wasn't like making any decisions cause someone else, Oh do a 1260 because Oh this or that or the expectations since I was three years old, you know, your whole life flashes before your eyes. And I felt so much that I was like, it was so for me and it was so clear that it was for me and it was the right time. And then kind of like, it's unpredictable, but I used that huge spike and come down and then, you know, you can feel more relaxed after that. And then I felt kind of euphoric cause I was like, you know, the hard part was already over and now the contest is about to start and I would just go rip a couple, you know, and it kind of simplified everything but allowing, that was where it happened. It wasn't, it wasn't after words where I think most people that would kind of be the process that was already over with that that huge flocks and emotion and , and confusion and everything and feeling and you're tingling and crying and being like, what is going on? And then, then you're back to normal. And I think that once I, once I evened out, it was so possible and it just got a little bit easier with each attempt and a little bit more relaxed. And then, you know, by the lot , by the third go , I trusted it and I knew I could do it and it was good. And I looked up and I was, I was back to, you know, I wasn't this stressed out person. I was like, I was focused and I was relaxed and you know, the trust was there. That's so important. And then it was over and I was just sitting, I was just standing there like, dude, you just went through that and you came out on top like good on you .

Dr. Shepp:

That's an awesome description of your mindset though. And though the way you're able to , to narrow your attention to what was about to take place cause it was all over the place. Right. And I remember watching you when you were 14 at your first X games and just the look on your face. I remember it was like just thinking, Oh my gosh. But then you came through it and it was so obvious that you are learning, like as you were going. Um , and not to take away from anything you did cause it was awesome. But like just to see, I mean I could see that you are just learning as you were going

Mitchie Brusco:

and I still am. And like there's no shame in , in that I'm going to make so many mistakes and that's fine. You get into capital , right. And hopefully that it does you well , you know, but I think it's a slow, you know, I don't snap in or out of Annie zones or any, yeah, shit slows down when it's time like for sure it gets more intense. But the weeks before it's just things start to change you . What you care about starts to change what you would I worry about if I like little things. If I wake up and I'm tired, I don't care because I'm going to here and I'm working on this and you slowly kind of, to me, I slowly kind of creep into this zone. By the time I'm on the flight going to whatever contest , I'm a brick wall. Like there's like I'm , I'm a happy go lucky kid smiling more times than not and running around and being stupid and skating around and you know like I just met like a 12 year old at the park who had a skateboard and we were like Alling over a trashcan and like you know like that is cool. But like by the time I get on the plane to go to a conscious , I'm so far in like step one I guess of or step two or three in that zone. That's like it just keeps narrowing and then afterwards it's not like it just ends. I think like after the 1260 is a great example cause it wasn't, it's not like it's over and you can just snap out of it. It's been like I was so deep that it's like, yeah weeks I bet of kind of re coming back to like life I guess. Like

Dr. Shepp:

and speaking of all these , so when you, when you knew you were going to do one over Conan O'Brien's head, what, what kind of nerves and fear enters your mind when it's not just about you potentially getting injured but somebody else,

Mitchie Brusco:

I mean [inaudible]

Dr. Shepp:

that one's on him. I'll be fine dude. Like

Mitchie Brusco:

you're six feet tall and add a couple inches because of the hair.

Dr. Shepp:

Like

Mitchie Brusco:

that kind of stuff is , is fun. The risk is different. Sure . But without you, like it's more of like fear of embarrassment than it is like fear of double femur ING, you know what I mean? So it's, it's a little bit less, it's a little bit different, you know, there's less preparation and less like, you know, seriousness. But those kinds of things, like you get used to pushing, right? You get used to doing something that makes you a little bit, makes you question just a little bit. And like, I think that's a huge key. Once you can, once you can, Oh Whoa, get nervous, question yourself a little bit. And they'd be like, Oh yeah, cool. And it's ready in . I think that's where a lot of people get kind of backwards. Do you know a breakaway layup in a basketball game? You're completely alone. You see the, how do I do? I put this leg and then some people are like, all right, I just went through that now. Just put it in the hoop, you know? And I think you just get used to that kind of get pressure in your own thing. And for me it's just like skateboarding on OnRamps for some reason. I like it though. I like I live for the moments, those kinds of moments I feel very comfortable. I have like, I think instead of trying to get away from those moments or avoid that, I think I put myself there in times that I shouldn't. Right . I'm at home, I'm in normal places with normal people and trying to have a conversation and my head's just like, dude, you're going to be standing on this ramp in three months and you're going to be this and thinking this. Did you prepare right to , Oh wait, okay wait, I'm around people. I'm, you know, a lot of times I'm home alone with a notebook, making notes, like pinning each trick I want to do in Iran to my wall and then like visualizing each one or watching videos of old runs and just cringing and being like, I never want to look like that again. And just kind of like living with that. Like those little write a trick painted on the wall, get that feeling. I couldn't, I can't do that 10 times in a row. And then you wake up and you're like, you know, you get used to those, those little fears. I think some does mentally rehearsing it help you get used to that. Yeah, I think I do that more than anyone for sure. I've always wrote writ written things down and I've always been very visual and different processes. I mean, one, one thing that's stayed very consistent is I'll pin pin my run to my wall for months sometimes. All right, I'll have each trick on one piece of paper. So it's its own separate pin . So like I know to me that's like a marker. I use that kind of as a marker to see if that trick makes me feel weird. Right. If, cause if I'm taking it seriously and I write five 40 and I pin it on the wall and I'm really comfortable with it. Cool. Right. And you'll know and then you say one trick and all he barely, he'll flit [inaudible] a weird part in the run and that one was hard for me and I miss it a lot. And I put it in the wall and I was like, Ooh , I gotta work on that one. You know? And then sometimes I'll do it again the next day. Sometimes I'll have stacks of three or four stacked on each other, pinned in the same spot of the same tricks. Sometimes I'll put them in my pillow case and sleep and then I'd move around. I hear it scrunch in the whole list, goes through my head. And just little things like that where I kind of try to live in it and it's, it's annoying for people. Other people who don't understand, you know, if I'm like having headphones on, writing notes, walking in circles, they're like, are you okay ? You know? And I'm like, what are you talking about? I'm great.

Dr. Shepp:

Part of what helps you to compete at your level. And I think it's great for people to hear about your preparation because there is so much that that goes into being top in your sport. You know, obviously you don't just show up and start trying tricks, which of course everybody knows. But I don't think everyone knows the mental side of the preparation for it. It's not just the physical, it's also, it's also largely mental.

Mitchie Brusco:

Yeah. And that's just how I'm wired. Right. I pick up a golf club, like I don't know what's important and what's not. You know, like I played a lot of video, like last year I built a computer, picked up a mouse and keyboard, never played on it. Played like 1600 hours in a year to get my hands to work how I want it , pick up a golf club and until I can shoot in the 80s nothing else exists. Are you shooting in the 80s I mean, I can sometimes. Yeah . Awesome . And so I'm juggling a golf ball in my room and watching videos and grabbing a stick or club or this or visualizing where the ball goes and you know, it just happens that skateboarding, I've done it long enough to where those same techniques are taking me to places that people really haven't been where in most things I'm just like a quick learner because mentally I'm so like focused and obsessive and I do things a genuinely love and I love them so much. I do it all the time and it's like focus I think is the hardest game for me to play. And if I can focus on skating, I think that's what I did. So good last, last year, focused on skating better than ever. Six months straight. I took six months off of skating and then six months. So that's the only thing that existed. Stop playing video games. I mean as much, maybe an hour, a couple, you know, twice a week, which for me is absolutely nothing. [inaudible] six months of skating. I didn't skydive. I barely flew in a tunnel, skated every day, five days a week, Monday through Friday. And I went home and I wrote notes and I made this and I made plans and I watched videos and, and that's kinda , that's the hardest game for me to play . Spoke it . And now since I've been so focused after the contest, it's really nice to just do it for fun skate. And you know, yesterday I woke up had I had a personal training, like my personal trainer to workout at eight. I scared it from nine 15 to nine 45 in the morning alone cause I knew like if I wanted to get a session and that's what I had to do, then I went and got coffee breakfast with uh , with some friends. We went skydiving, went and flew in the wind tunnel right after and I went home and played video games and then I woke up so tired today and, but being able to do that now is like, that's the reward I think because my anxiety for at least a little bit is gone because I worked so hard. I did my thing. Now my day can be super spread thin, which I really like jumping from one thing to the next and right. Staying entertained and saying , but slowly I'll have to start bringing that back down to where my day is going to look more like working out. Hopefully I can grab breakfast with a friend and then go skate. Not from nine 15 to nine 45 but from 11 to two 11 to three than hang out and think and then, and then decide, okay, is my night, am I gonna fly in the wind tunnel or am I gonna play an hour of video games? Like kind of having to make these decisions, these small sacrifices. It's like you can do one skydive on Wednesday morning if you wake up early enough, you know, kind of getting that schedule dialed in, but right now do it all, do everything. A little bit of everything. Just have flood and like, yeah, it's kind of like, it's an interesting way that I've found a stay dressed . So fresh,

Dr. Shepp:

passionate. Yeah. And balanced. I mean, because even though you're intense about what you do, you found a way to bring things into your life that, that keep you balanced. You're not just thinking about skateboarding all the time. Yeah , I mean in that that's,

Mitchie Brusco:

that's my main killer. Okay. And I say focus is hard for me, but focus is hard because I get so bored. Like I can love something so intensely and just put it down and be done with it once I am. And having other things that keep me keep me fresh and not, and I'm not saying like sometimes I jump out of an airplane to stay fresh. It's like I have something that I treat as important as skateboarding, sometimes more important. That makes me a different person, a whole different person, a whole new me. And then all of a sudden I remember, Oh, I can skateboard, I can do this stuff. Let me pick up a board or a couple of my friends, I haven't talked to her going after a couple of months , go step on a board and then you're back and you're like, wait, this is me. And then you're like, Oh my , and then you're fresh and you're like, Oh I forgot about this side. And it's like, I think compartmentalizing these sports for me is really like this week has been tonal flying . Like today I got an hour of coaching, I was getting coached for an hour straight and that was, that's Wednesday to Sunday. Every day an hour straight. And I show up there early and I watch videos and I make notes and go, go, go. I get out, I watched that session, I make more notes, I ask questions, I make a list, I make a plan, get back in, you know, Wednesday to Sunday, boom every day. And then when that's over I kind of snap out of it and I'm like, wait, that's not even my thing. Like, and I treat it so seriously that it's like get back on my skateboard and it's like I love this so much and it's so much. And the thing is skateboarding is hard physically, but it's so much easier mentally than almost anything I know how to do because I , I know myself so well. Yeah. Cause you've been doing it since you could run. It's like it's therapeutic in that way where even if I can't do something, I know why and I know how to fix it and even if I can't fix it right now, I will work on getting my foot like this and opening my hip like that and putting my head here and there's no stress and it's like so nice in that way. But then it's nice to go to something new like tonifying where I need someone else doing that for me. Hey your foot's like this. You ought to turn more here. You , your came in late, you were this, your timing's off. Where I can feel that in skating and I get in . So like golf is the same thing. You know, I take lessons and I do these things. I play with my dad and I go try to make 103 footers in a row and just torture myself and I have no idea what's going on. And then yeah , it puts into perspective like, wow, okay, I am good at skating. Like, but only because I understand it only because I've spent hours and hours and hours, you know, where I can kind of just coach, coach myself a lot. And I like that.

Dr. Shepp:

But you've also spent hours and hours and hours with skydiving and now with e-sports, right? So aren't you wanting to compete in both of those areas as well?

Mitchie Brusco:

Well, and lo and behold, I mean I have over 900 skydives in the, in four years and over a hundred hours in the wind tunnel. And I should be able to double that within this calendar year, which is an insane opportunity. And then as in , I have a tunnel competition coming up in October that I've just put together of a four way team and a two way team. So I'll be in two different disciplines. Um, and I actually got to compete in an East sports event for ESPN just a couple of weeks before X games. Which game was it? Uh , apex legends, which is a game that I love, but it's not like one that I'm playing like a whole lot, but I absolutely love it. And the opportunity was great. And do the craziest thing. What happened, I'm good at, I'm good at video games and shooters and stuff, but I'm pretty new with mouse and keyboard in. The same thing happened. Like I turned it on. I was very good with my hands, my keys. I was like very methodical with the buttons and the sequences and it was smooth and my aim was okay, was good enough. I was hitting clutch shots and attacking when I needed to in surviving and staying alive. But when other times, and it was such a cool thing to be on stage with the streamers that I've known for a long time and watch on Twitch. Right? Yeah. Yeah. I mean I, I'm obsessed with Twitch. I stream myself and being with these guys that I see all the time and competing against them and killing some of them, it's like, you know, it makes it a reality and everyone's just having fun. It was for charity, it wasn't something anyone trained for. So everyone was laughing and it was a good time, but it opened that door. And so like, yeah, skating, skydiving, like as far as flying parachutes. And then C , indoor Scott IQ , like body flying, indoor skydiving, competing in that and just flipping that switch in . Each of those sports is like, you know, I do it for a while for fun and then you go, okay, it's time. Like let's see , let's compete in this . Soon as that happens, the whole sport changes. Scary things get less scary, hard. Things get less hard. It's easier to be motivated for me and then it's like it's diamond. You just kind of shift from one to the next to the neck. Like I'm totally present. I don't take shortcuts. I like learning the slow and methodical way because I know that when that's over it's going to be gold time and it's like I love when that happens and that just happened in , in tunnel flying probably three months ago. That shift happened where it's like, I love this, but I don't want to just fly around with no purpose anymore. Like it's like I want my feet a certain way. I want my hips a certain way. I want my eyes to see things like a competitor. I want to know where I am. Not, not sort of like, I want to know exactly where I am and I want to know how to go fast, slow in the middle, faster than fast, faster than that fast. And you know, it's like I love when that, when that happens and it kind of happened naturally and ever since I've been, I was at the tunnel today and people were asking me, are you okay? And it just made me laugh because in skateboarding at when I'm at a contest or I'm in practice, I hear all the time, Oh, I saw you, I didn't want to bother you . You looked focus and it, I'm used to that. But at the tunnel where I'm flying around, I've always been happy and go-lucky and smiling and running around and poking fun and you know, take your hat and run away. And today I walked in and I didn't say anything and I had my headphones and I was watching and I was hiding my notebook and you know, people are really, Hey already is everything okay? And it's like, yeah, it's just, you're not used to this side. No ,

Dr. Shepp:

that's a great description of the shift. Yeah.

Speaker 6:

Okay .

Dr. Shepp:

So people who might be used to you are the, are the roommates that you have, right. I , I work with some East sports players that live in a house together and of course you have to adjust to being around someone else who does what you do. Cause there's different personalities. So I imagined the, was it six or seven of you that have different personalities? What's that like for you?

Mitchie Brusco:

Uh , they all know me very well, but I can feel the little bit of distance because everyone's a skateboarder, right. And half the time I'm not, and they don't really venture out like that. And it's really weird because I'll disappear for months at a time. You know, I'm in Spain skydiving, I'm sorry I missed your call. Like , you know, yeah . You know what I mean? So it's like, Oh, are you going to be, are you going to be competing or are you going to be? And then like I said, I don't wanna just like go to the skate park. It's like, okay, I'm back from wherever I was. If it was skydiving, tunnel flying video games or whatever, it would gall , you know, I was on a golf trip to, you know, Vegas like with my dad, you know, and then I come back and it's like, it's not like I go hang out at the skate park. It's like, okay, I'm gonna go get ready for X games. Now we're at , I'm at the vert ramp at a warehouse alone at nine in the morning. So it's like they all know me and I've can tell that I've built a lot of trust in like, they're less confused in the whole process, but it's like, it is a , I'm very definitely on my own speed for sure. And you're comfortable that way? You're way more comfortable. I mean, I, I've, I've lived a lot of moments naturally where I kind of lines up with other people's kind of rhythms and it only lasts for so long before my, my kind of need for to change something kind of kicks in. Yeah. And like I don't really like feeling like I would say I don't like maxing out. Like, there's only so much you can do if you're, you know, going to a certain place every day or you know, you kind of get into like this rhythm that, you know, you just know it's not going to change. It's not going anywhere. And that's when I freak out and kind of change everything. It's like I'm going to go to this drop zone in this place alone, see who I meet and I'll feel way better. Cause then all of a sudden you're on a different rhythm and you get re that imagination is sparked and you know, that kind of stuff is like, I always, I feel like make that shift when it starts to get like, monotonous or like dull in a way.

Dr. Shepp:

But you're describing something that's really internal, right? Because some athletes have the expectation from their sponsors or their family or their coaches and they're , they're motivated by some of the external or the accolades, the praise. But you, and then also, you know, you mentioned Matt Hoffman, Travis Pastrana, there's an , there's an internal moment .

Mitchie Brusco:

Yeah. And they're very , uh, internal people as well. Bob Burnquist as well. And , uh, I lost all my , I shed it. I like to say I shed it all my sponsors when I was 18, I had some good sponsors that wanted me to post certain things and go certain places. And that same thing happened. That same feeling where I was like, Nope, sorry, like I'm actually going to disappear for awhile . Don't know why. But I like skydiving. So catch me in a couple of years when you realize that this whole thing is going to make sense and it wasn't a struggle. It felt good. There were times where I've looked back and I've been like, Ooh, maybe I should have made this work. But then you get through it and you're like, I've opened this door with I fly because I didn't have an energy drink sponsor. I didn't have these things. And I've had opportunities with Twitch and the streaming in the, in the video games on ESPN because I can post video games on my Instagram. I can post 10 10 videos of skydiving, a couple of things, a tunnel flying, some video game clips. Someone asks if I've been skating. I said no and no one cares. And it's like in I fly is awesome because they believe in me. It's like, Oh that's great. They're ski , the skateboarding is great. They didn't sign me cause I was going to do a 1260 they didn't know that wasn't what it's about. I told them I was probably not gonna do anything like as long as that expectation is there, then it's, if you sign me with that man I'll be your favorite. And it's like that's my one sponsor now. And it's like they believe in me, I'm allowed to do whatever. And it's like it's a story telling business. It's not a, I'm not chasing a dragon of accomplishments, you know, cause you know, I mean knock on wood, I'm, I'm one mistake away from not doing what I do, you know, at a breath, wrong time, I ought to take this contest off, which is fine. As long as that precedence is set and it's known and everyone is, you know, onboard. It's like dude, but that's why, you know, I want to , I want to have like my own podcast. I like streaming. I like doing these things. That's like, I'll have fun. I'll figure it out. Like, yeah. And I won't go anywhere because that's for sure.

Dr. Shepp:

Well that comes back to you being an innovator for sure. Yeah. You've been awesome with your time and , and we can keep talking, but it did get dark out here and for awhile there were no lights. So we're on a porch in the OSI and it was pitch black for awhile , kind of . I didn't even see, but , but , um, that's, that's cool though because we were just having a good conversation. So I have some questions that I ask everybody. Perfect. Um, so if, if it's okay,

Mitchie Brusco:

please , please.

Dr. Shepp:

So Michi what in life are you still curious about?

Mitchie Brusco:

I'm curious because I have so much to look back on already, which is insane. At 22 years old, like I have a lifetime to look back on. I've lived an entire lifetime by 22. And I mean that and the wisdom and the things that I've learned. It's like if I stay the course, the kind of the kind of intuition and the , the little things I'll be aware of and the stories I'll have to tell and the life I have to look back on. I th I think that's what is making me curious because my consistency is the only done me good and I want to keep that. So in another 10 years of whatever it is, it's like the road, the road is going to be wild. And I know and I know that.

Dr. Shepp:

So you're curious what else you can do where else you can go? Yeah, 100% so some people say that praise is more distracting because it's something to live up to. And other people say criticism. So what , what's more distracting to you?

Mitchie Brusco:

The thing that's most distracting is actually neither of those. The , the thing that's most distracting to me is the people who don't know what go is going on that's barely like, Oh I heard you did this. Like congrats. And I don't know, it's either I tell them my life story or I just say thank you and it's the most surface level thing ever. And then it's over and it's like, I don't know your name. You don't really know me. And what do we talk about now it's like I don't, I think if someone genuinely compliments, Hey, like what I saw you do motivated me in this area in my life. Like to me that's like a form of praise. And that makes me feel like you understand what I put into it. And if there's criticism and it makes sense and it's reasonable, which I've asked for and, and I think I get the most criticism from the skaters who are really close to me because they know me and keep me in check and I ask for that and it's, I'm thankful for it. So those things, kind of the criticism in the praise, cause there's both those kind of keep me in, in line. It's the kind of weird stuff in the middle that I don't know how to, I wish that would go away. I wish I was either. Hello, my name's Mitch. It's nice to meet you. Like what's your name? How was your day? It's like cool, like you have a normal right. And it's like that kind of stuff where it's just like, I don't know how to navigate a normal commerce . Oh, I heard you did this thing. It's like I did a thing. You know that . So I would say that.

Dr. Shepp:

Okay. That's a great answer. Yeah, that's , that's a great answer. As a skateboarder, you obviously prepare for every, for every run, right ? Yet the unexpected happens. What is something unexpected that has happened to you in your sport?

Mitchie Brusco:

So within I think what, what's happened unexpected, what has happened for me that's unexpected is the amount that I change . When a contest starts, I can go in with absolutely no there no chance right now, right before the contest, zero chance that I could make half of these tricks and then the contest starts and all of a sudden I can do everything. And that was so unexpected for me when I was young and it's been really hard to learn how to manage that and not rely on it. But play into it. And so that has been super when I was 14. I remember that being a really weird, unexpected thing that I like. Okay. How do you, how do you prepare for, for that moment? Because you know, it's different than how you feel right now, but you can't, you only get those moments and it's basically a blackout. So how do you, you know what, you know what I mean? I do know what you mean. Yeah. So I would say that.

Dr. Shepp:

So what is one comment or, or tweet that still stands out to you, whether it's because it's good or bad or for whatever reason? I mean, it could be something that someone says to you after a competition. It could be something that just comes out of the blue.

Mitchie Brusco:

Uh, when I was pretty one of my, I think second X games, second X games. Yeah. In LA will, Wayne tweeted me right after. It's like Mitchie be going crazy. And that was like such an insane moment. Very being w I was 14 maybe it may my friends listen a little Wayne and stuff like, you know, at that age it's like, it's funny. I don't know. Um, and so that was like kind of getting attention from these weird places that you don't really expect. Yeah.

Dr. Shepp:

How do you recover from failure?

Mitchie Brusco:

I fail every single day. I feel way more comfortable with failure than I do success because it happens so much more often that it makes me feel completely like I'm doing something right. Right. If I won , like after X games, I did really good. I wanted to get home and get back to a ramp and try really hard at some things that I struggle with because that to me is, is grounding

Speaker 5:

and

Mitchie Brusco:

there's different levels of failure. Let's say X games didn't go well, that would hurt. Right? But it would boost my consistency. It would boost my work ethic because I know I made a mistake. There's no, no one else to blame.

Speaker 5:

And

Mitchie Brusco:

I like it. And sometimes I don't enjoy small pats on the back. I don't enjoy, if I'm not ready to Pat myself on the back, I don't need a small compliment. I don't need a, Hey, it happens. I know it happens. I know everyone fails. I know I'm going to fail a lot more. I know it's okay. It's like just wait until I do it and we can, we can smile, you know? And so I think living in that failure, I like it. I don't know, I just like it.

Dr. Shepp:

That's an awesome perspective because I think so many people are afraid of failure. Um , of course it's gonna limit the risks that someone takes if they're afraid to fail. But you see it as not just a learning process, but actually something that really benefits your life.

Speaker 5:

I mean,

Mitchie Brusco:

it's like I've had so many instances where I'm absolutely terrible at something, first time doing it and so comfortable with being terrible at it, that it almost makes whoever's teaching me like chuckle. Like I remember I got lessons from a golf coach and I'm just standing there. He's like, okay. And says a couple of words. I don't know. And I was just saying , I was just like, instead of instead of taking a swing, I was just like, I don't know what that means, and he just was taken back because it's more important for a lot of people to fake that they know what's going on where to me it's like there's no shame if people preach failure. Michael Jordan preach failure. Wayne Gretzky and it's so, you know, overly Don and like, but the, you either enjoy the grind or you don't. I think that's like a very simple, easy to understand. Either you enjoy the hard days or you don't, you know, everyone feels like a rock star sometimes with the days you feel very normal, you either love it or it's very simple and I think I look at those days of what most people would perceive as failure. I skated bad today, but is that a failure or is that part of the process? Is that, are you going to have good days and bad days? Are you going to have good contests and bad contests ? It's like a joke. My friend and I would always say when we could , we both would like get spikes of anxiety and freak out and you know, teenagers and trying to figure everything out. And one day he was like, dude, like today is not the day that everything falls apart. Right. And we don't , and we'd always joke once we'd get into that goat zone, we'd sarcastic, we will today's the day and it would, it would kind of snap us out of it cause we'd realize like do today's not the day that there's, so there's everything in front of you, so mean you can use the word failure. But to me it's like I love to get, I love when I'm sore and in pain and struggling and sucking and that's fine. It's just what it is. Kind of just keep pushing.

Dr. Shepp:

That's awesome. I mean that's, that's a lot of wisdom from a 22 year old, but I think it's going to be really helpful for people to hear your mindset and, and help people to be able to maybe cope with their own failures a little bit better.

Mitchie Brusco:

I mean, I, I sure hope that like it , that's what builds trust in yourself. Like when you know, you worked through don't give up, like don't stop, but you know, if it takes two years, five, seven, 10 years, 15 years, it's like once you work through it, genuinely work through it, you can put that in your pocket and you have that in your arsenal now you have that ammo, that protection from like, you know, the, the, the idea of failure. You're like, well, I worked through it and I can do this now. I know, you know, you get through school and you know certain things and you know, it no one can take that away. And it's the same thing in sports for me. So those days that I'm like confused and my body's like not listening and I know that one day I'll be comfortable in that same same place and I've just built so much trust for that. Right .

Dr. Shepp:

I can totally hear it. Yeah. Yeah. You really do trust the process. Yeah. And you trust yourself. Yeah. Yeah, for sure. I mean, yeah. What else was there? Have you ever had what you would say was a transformative moment, whether it's in your sport or in life, and if so, what was it that

Mitchie Brusco:

Ben ? A lot of of little moments, but there were some times when I was pretty young where I made some big decisions and I took them seriously. And you know, moving to California, I had a lot of responsibilities at 13 years old. I had basically had to do well in contests to stay in California is to put it simply, yeah, we didn't have money, you know , to do that. So the contest were very important. So making that decision, even though it wasn't something that happened to me, it was kind of all of a sudden it was time. And so that more than transformed, I think set a path and kind of like at a place where I could have chosen left or right. I kind of went straight. And I think that hardened me a lot in the process because I haven't gone anywhere since that day. You know what I mean? Yep . So less than like a transforming moment. It's more like there's some been some pivotal decision making times shedding some sponsors. Yeah, that was another one. That's a lifestyle choice and there's no going back. I'm either gonna be running around trying to please Pete please, companies and things and do what I want and do what they want or I'm not. This middle ground makes no one happy, it's going to end in disaster. And so it's like, I think that was like a huge shaping, a huge transformation moment, a huge shaping moment that I didn't know what it meant and I didn't know, but I knew it felt right. And then staying consistent in that. Now four years later I'm like, have a sponsor that believes in that and I have some new tricks that kind of came from being a little bit unique and I have different stickers on my helmet. Then the rest of the guys and I have a different lifestyle and it's starting to really show and it's only been, you know, four years, which I think to a lot of people, especially a 22 four years, God , it's a very short amount of time. You know, you know, I've been competing 10 years and I'm just kind of figuring out, being consistent enough, but it's like I'm just kind of, and I'll get, I'll get knocked back and I know I will. I'm going to take fat else , huge losses and it's going to be tough because of how hard I work. But it's just, it is what it is, you know, just trying, trying to, so those, those, those moments, those two I think stick out to me a lot. And it's funny cause neither of those are external. Right. It's funny, like I realized that it's just like decisions that I made that, I mean, I guess unless it's a traumatic experience, that's going to be what transformations kind of are. Yeah. Yeah.

Dr. Shepp:

Well you have a lot of self awareness. Um, you do, you do you , you know yourself really well, not just as an athlete but, but as a human being.

Mitchie Brusco:

Yeah. I try to, I mean I'm learning, I'm young so I'm still learning a lot, you know, we all are. Yeah. Yeah, for sure.

Dr. Shepp:

Which leads me to the last question. So in like 30 seconds or less, what have you learned about yourself in your particular sport? In as being a skateboarder?

Mitchie Brusco:

Man, what I, what I've learned about myself, just having fun and staying consistent, like practicing for consistency over perfection is going to be so much better for longevity and staying safe and healthy and put, keep pushing forward is kind of the, the rhythm you gotta keep in whatever you do. Because if you look for anything else, it's just gonna fizzle out. It's going to be a flash in the pan.

Dr. Shepp:

Great answer. I've learned a lot about you in our conversation and I'm sure people listening will feel like they did as well. And I think you've shared a lot about just your mindset that um, will open a lot of a lot of eyes, which is great. Thank you so much for your time. This is a great conversation. I appreciate it. Well it got dark so I couldn't see my watch anymore, but I'm no, seriously Mitch, thanks. I appreciate it. Thank you. It's nice to meet you and talk.

Speaker 6:

Good to talk to you. This has been managed. The moment with dr [inaudible] . Life is a collection of moments. It's how you manage those moments that makes the difference. My thanks again to Michi Brusco or look not only at his accomplishments and his pursuit of continued excellence, but for the wisdom that he has gained as he has made some difficult decisions along the way. And thank you for listening. For more information about the manage the moment podcast, you can see the episode notes for this broadcast and you can follow us on social media and I'm on Twitter at dr Shep. You can subscribe to this podcast on Apple podcasts, Google podcasts, or wherever you choose to listen to podcasts. Thanks so much for listening and sharing these moments with us. Until next time

Speaker 7:

on the next episode of manage , the moment we will be chatting with five time e-sports world champion, Stephanie Harvey. She has many things to say not only about e-sports, but as an innovator, as a game designer and as an advocate. I think the internet should be like sex. Sex is in schools and we teach these kids how to have good relationships and why sex can be dangerous. So why you're going to have sex your own life most likely and why it should be a fun experience. And we teach that very young to make sure that people understand the limits, right? We don't do that from the internet, but you needed it . It's the same thing. You're going to have most of the time a positive experience, but like yo hurt. Like it's the same thing for me as sex and we need to understand the consequences really young before it's too late. You can subscribe to the manage the moment podcast on Apple podcasts, Google, Spotify, or wherever you choose to subscribe and listen to podcasts. Until next time.